Eureka Magazine — January 2018


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DESIGN
INNOVATE
ENGINEER
www.eurekamagazine.co.uk
January 2018
P21
AM PUT TO USE
IN HEALTHCARE
IN THIS
ISSUE
TO INDUSTRY
WHY MORE FIRMS ARE
SEEKING TO PARTNER
WITH THE RAPID
WORLD OF F1
P28
LOW COST IOT FOR
INSTALLED MOTORS
P26
FINDING THE RIGHT
LINEAR ACTUATOR
P30
THE USE OF AR
IN INDUSTRY
JANUARY 2018
EUREKA!
12
COVER STORY
F1 AND INDUSTRY
In the world of Formula One,
what do the companies whose
logos adorn the vehicles get
out of the deal? And how can
wider industry benefit from
the relationship?
18
ON THE TOPIC OFƒ
SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Millions of newborns are at
risk of lifelong disability from
easily treatable conditions.
Its solving these kinds of
problems that motivates
Design that Matters.
21
RAPID PROTOTYPING
AM MAKES IMPLANTS
FOR HOSPITALS
The use of metal additive
manufacturing machines is
allowing medical professionals
to pioneer the use of custom
made implants for use within
the NHS.
24
POWER TRANSMISSION
ELECTROHYDRAULIC
VALVE CONTROL
Despite the internal
combustion engine (ICE)
coming under fire in recent
months, it hasnt stopped
ongoing work to make all ICEs
cleaner and more efficient.
26
LINEAR MOTION
SELECTING ACTUATORS
FOR YOUR APPLICATION
The trade-offs between
pneumatic, hydraulic and
electromechanical linear
actuators are seldom
understood. We give a
rundown of key criteria when
making the selection for your
next project.
28
SENSORS
MAKING IOT EASY
Condition monitoring and
predictive maintenance are
not new, but as the cost of
entry drops, we ask if IoT
is really about making the
technology accessible?
30
INDUSTRY 4.0
AUGMENTING THE
WORKFORCE
As the augmented reality
improves, manufacturers
are increasingly keen to
implement capable devices
to workers to get more digital
information on the production
line in an effort to boost
quality and productivity.
33
DESIGN PLUS
R&D TAX CREDITS
The UKs engineering and
manufacturing sectors
are world famous for their
expertise and ingenuity, yet
infamous for being behind
other sectors when it comes
to claiming R&D tax credits.
Here, Eureka! puts forward
why you should claim.
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
VOLUME 38
NUMBER 01
05
COMMENT
Why industry needs to
stop obsessing about
BREXIT and move on
from the divorce.
06
NEWS
Facebook opens UK
engineering hub
Responses to the
Industrial Strategy
€ Bionic limbs
for babies and
toddlers
€ Breaking ground on
Factory of tomorrow
35
COFFEE TIME
CHALLENGE
The invisible helmet:
Can you come up with a
bike helmet that gives
better protection but
cant be seen?
REGULARS
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
EDITORS COMMENT
EXPECT THE FLAVOUR
of 2018 to be
vanilla. Why? With just about everyone
worried about the fallout of BREXIT, our
declining productivity as a nation and the
continuation of an unpopular
Government, no one anywhere wants to
rock the boat. Slow and steady has
become the name of the game.
From boardrooms to the cabinet to
the water cooler, I get the sense a lot
of people are pushing the mantra of,
dont do anything stupid until this mess
blows over. It means being bold is not
a position anyone particularly wants to
entertain at the moment. That is except,
of course, for every other nation around
the globe. Believe it or not, the rest of the
world doesnt really care about BREXIT
äñçòøõìñöøïäõóõòåïèðöäñçìñ
êë÷ìñê
The UK and Europe desperately need
to move beyond this self absorption that
has swept over us these last 18 months or
so. We need to look outwards once again
and get some sense of purpose of what
it means to be British, and not European.
Please, everyone, keep it amicable and lets
move on. If we dont, this divorce is about
to get a lot worse than the upfront bill.
àëìïèúèëäùèåèèñìñúäõçïü
êë÷ìñê
other industrial nations have seen the
disdain and a sense of entitlement from
all sides. They see it for what it is; a
trading landscape rife with opportunities.
Its divide and conquer, except we are the
ones doing the dividing.
China and India are two examples
÷ëä÷äõèîèèñ÷òóõòêõèööôøìæîïüäñç
ñç
some quick wins as European business
leaders sit on their hands in these
uncertain times. The two countries have
been investing heavily in Industry 4.0
technologies and automation, and are
producing engineers like they are going
out of fashion.
So, perhaps it is time to be bolder
and see 2018 as the year that we all
took the decision to move on from a
messy divorce and see BREXIT as an
opportunity to realign the economy, be
bold with industrial strategy and actually
start to invest and implement technology
that will add-value and make us more
competitive.
Justin Cunningham,
Editor
WE NEED
TO STOP
TALKING
BREXIT
MISSION
STATEMENT
DESIGN
INNOVATE
ENGINEER
Eureka!
connects design
engineers with the UKs
industrial heartbeat by
providing in-depth coverage
on the very latest technology
developments and industry
trends; keeping you inspired,
informed and innovative.
Picture Credit: Adobe Stock
Editor
JUSTIN CUNNINGHAM
[email protected]
Assistant Editor
ÝØÖÊÞÜÝÒ×´ÖØÛÐÊ×
[email protected]
Consulting Editors
×ÎÒÕÝâÕÎÛ
Art Editor
ÌÑÛÒÜÌÑÊÛÕÎÜ
[email protected]
ÊÍßÎÛÝÒÜÒ×ÐÜÊÕÎÜ !#""""!!$$
Sales Director
ÓÎãàÊÕÝÎÛÜ
[email protected]
Sales Manager
ÓÊÖÎÜÌÛÎËÎÛ
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Production
ÑÎÊÝÑÎÛàØØÍÕÎâ
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Circulation Manager
ÌÑÛÒÜÓØ×ÎÜ
[email protected]
Publisher
ÕÞÔÎàÎËÜÝÎÛ
[email protected]
SSN-0261-2097 (Print)
ISSN 2049-2324 (Online)
Eureka! (incorporating Engineering Materials and Design
äñçÍèöìêñ×èúö¥ìöéõèè÷òìñçìùìçøäïöúëòéøïï÷ëè
publishers criteria. Annual subscriptions are £81 UK
(£118 overseas or £153 airmail).
Eureka! is published by
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If you change jobs or your company moves to a new
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Eastern expansion plans
(QYLVDJH*URXS
QDQFHGLUHFWRU
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
BUSINESS SECRETARY
Greg Clark launched
the Governments
Industrial Strategy
on 27 November
2017, setting out
a long-term vision
for how Britain
can build on its
economic strengths,
address its productivity
performance, embrace
technological change and
boost the earning power of people
across the UK.
With the aim of making the UK
the worlds most innovative nation
by 2030, the Government will invest
£725m over the next three years in
the Industrial Strategy Challenge
Fund (ISCF) to respond to some of
the greatest global challenges and
opportunities faced by the UK.
Construction, life sciences,
automotive and AI are earmarked to
åè÷ëèõö÷÷òåèñè÷éõòðö÷õä÷èêìæ
and long-term partnerships with
Government, backed by private
sector co-investment.
Clark said: The Industrial
Strategy is an unashamedly
ambitious vision for the future of our
country, laying out how we tackle
our productivity challenge, earn our
way in the future, and improve living
standards across the country.Ž
Ýëèúëì÷èóäóèõéòæøöèöòñ
ùè
foundations of productivity … ideas,
people, infrastructure, business
environment and places. Each
foundation is supported by policies
designed to provide businesses
with certainty and reassurance
that the UK will continue to have a
competitive edge, including: raising
total R&D investment to 2.4% of GDP
by 2027; increasing the rate of R&D
tax credit to 12%; and the investment
in the ISCF programmes to capture
the value of innovation.
To ensure that the Government
is held to account on its progress
in delivering the strategy, an
Independent Industrial Strategy
Council will be launched in 2018.
Juergen Maier, CEO Siemens UK,
said: We are optimistic that through
greater investment in R&D, especially
through the application of advanced
industrial digital technologies like
AI and robotics, we can support
many more new and existing
manufacturing industries … raising
productivity and creating thousands
of highly skilled, well-paid jobs.Ž
Mike Cherry, national chairman
of Federation of Small Businesses,
said: The UKs 5.5 million small
businesses have a huge role to play
if we are to increase productivity
across the economy. This is the
only way to achieve sustained wage
growth and higher living standards.
We particularly welcome the focus
on improving technical skills, new
physical and digital infrastructure and
increased R&D.Ž
Sally Benton, director of policy
& research at the Design Council
said that while she welcomed the
recognition of the importance of
design for the future of the UKs
economy, it is still absent from
practical policy discussions.
Whilst the strategy opens the
door to design it does not incorporate
design across R&D infrastructure,
open tax incentives for business to
use design, or address the urgent
need for design skills across our
economy by incorporating design
into new T-Levels or wider STEM
subjects,Ž she said.
Carolyn Fairbairn, director general
of the CBI, welcomed the message
behind the strategy but added that
it is only the start. She said: The
hard work starts now. [The Industrial
Strategy] must be the beginning of
a strategic race, not a tactical sprint.
And it needs to last.
This is a time for consistency and
determination, not perpetual change
with the political winds. The creation
of an independent council with teeth
to monitor progress will help this.Ž
David Bailey, Professor of Industry
at Aston University also described
the strategy as welcome newsŽ but
added to the voices questioning if the
äðòøñ÷öðèñ÷ìòñèçúèõèöø
æìèñ÷
to make any real impact.
Given the scale of the challenge,
investment of £725m is unlikely to be
enough and the competition for cash
will be high across a broad range of
sectors,Ž he said.
These concerns were
echoed by Mike Thornton, head
of manufacturing at RSM, who
questioned whether the promised
money would ever materialise against
what he called the, backdrop of a
weaker growth forecast for the UK
and uncertainty around BrexitŽ. He
added: It will be interesting to see
whether the Government has the
ñäñæìäïæïòø÷÷òçèïìùèõ÷ëìöö÷õä÷èêü
against a backdrop of continued
austerity.Ž
RESPONSES TO THE
INDUSTRIAL STRATEGY
BUSINESS
NEWS
ADDNODE GROUP
ACQUIRES MCAD
Symetri, an Addnode Group
company and provider of
software and services for
design, data management
äñçúòõîòúöëäöäæôøìõèç
MCAD Sverige. MCAD will
become part of Symetris
design management business
area.
ANSYS BUYS 3DSIM
Ê×ÜâÜëäöäæôøìõèç#ÍÜÒÖ
a developer of additive
manufacturing simulation
÷èæëñòïòêüÊ×ÜâÜöäüö
÷ëìöäæôøìöì÷ìòñêìùèöì÷÷ëè
industrys only complete
additive manufacturing
öìðøïä÷ìòñúòõî
òú
AIRBUS SIGNS
$17.2BN DEAL WITH
WIZZ AIR
Êìõåøöëäööìêñèçäçèäï
úì÷ëÎøõòóèäñäìõïìñèàìýý
Air Holdings, relating to
÷ëèóøõæëäöèòé!$&Êìõåøö
Ê#" ñèòäìõæõäé÷Ê÷æøõõèñ÷
ïìö÷óõìæèö÷ëèäìõæõäé÷äõè
úòõ÷ëðòõè÷ëäñÞÜz!'"
billion.
PTC PARTNERS
CONTINUING
GROWTH
PTC says its partner
programme is continuing
÷òöëòúðòðèñ÷øðúì÷ë
ðòõè÷ëäñëäïéòéóäõ÷ñèõö
experiencing double-digit
êõòú÷ëìñ÷ëèïäö÷üèäõØùèõ
÷ëèóäö÷÷ëõèèüèäõö÷ëè
number of PTC partners
ëäöêõòúñåü$%]÷ò÷äïïìñê
äóóõòûìðä÷èïü!!% 
companies worldwide.
Picture Credit: Adobe Stock
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
JANUARY 2018
ÊÐÛØÞ×Í´ËÛÎÊÔÒ×Ð
ceremony
has taken place at
÷ëèöì÷èòéÜæëäè
èõö
õö÷
smart factory … the Factory for
÷òðòõõòú¢ìñáìäñê÷äñÌëìñä
Ýëèæòñö÷õøæ÷ìòñòé÷ëè#!% ð
óïäñ÷úìïïåèêìñìñ" !(äñçì÷ìö
èûóèæ÷èç÷òö÷äõ÷òóèõä÷ìñêìñ" !)
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çèóäõ÷ðèñ÷öäõèäææòððòçä÷èç
Ýëìöäõõäñêèðèñ÷ìöçèöìêñèç÷ò
improve internal communication.
Ýëèóõòçøæ÷ìòñäõèäëäöäðòçøïäõ
çèöìêñúëìæëðèäñö÷ëä÷ñèú
óõòçøæ÷ìòñïìñèöäñçóõòçøæ÷
õäñêèöæäñåèèäöìïüäççèç
We want to actively shape
Öòåìïì÷üéòõ÷òðòõõòúúëìæë
ìöúëüúèäõèæòñæèñ÷õä÷ìñê
on the key opportunities for
éø÷øõèè¡ðòåìïì÷üÒñçøö÷õü$ 
äñççìêì÷äïìöä÷ìòñ\röäìçØïìùèõ
Óøñêæëìèéòóèõä÷ìñêò
æèõòé
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äóóõòäæëúèúäñ÷÷òöëäóè÷ëè
Ïäæ÷òõüéòõ÷òðòõõòúöò÷ëä÷úè
æäñðäîèòøõóõòçøæ÷ìòñóïäñ÷ö
÷éòõ÷ëèéø÷øõè\r
The Factory for tomorrow
will manufacture components
äñçöüö÷èðöéòõèñêìñèö
÷õäñöðìööìòñöäñçæëäööìööüö÷èðö
éòõ÷ëèäø÷òðò÷ìùèìñçøö÷õüÝëèöè
óõòçøæ÷öäìð÷òõèçøæèèðìööìòñö
äñçìñæõèäöèçõìùìñêæòðéòõ÷
NEWS
EUREKA!
SMOOTH SCADA SOLUTION
TECH
ËÛÒÎÏ
ÝÎÛÖÒ×ÊÕØÙÎÛÊÝÒ×ÐÜâÜÝÎÖ
provider
DBIS has created a solution for smoother
integration of SCADA software for all models
of programmable logic controllers (PLCs).
Most PLC manufacturers provide
proprietary SCADA software,
÷äìïòõèçöóèæìæäïïüéòõøöè
with respective machinery,
ðäîìñêì÷çì\bæøï÷÷ò
ñçæòðóä÷ìåïèÙÕÌö
for manufacturing
environments.
To solve this, DBIS
researched a software
solution that was not
öóèæì
æ÷òòñèÙÕÌ
manufacturer alone
and, therefore,
can work
across a range
of projects,
regardless
of the make
and model. Seeking software that could be
standardised for all automation platforms,
DBIS sought help from independent supplier
of industrial automation software, COPA-
DATA UK.
DBIS deployed COPA-DATA UKs zenon
standardised, hardware independent
software across all its projects from waste,
mining and tunnelling to materials
handling, conveyor and rail industries.
Compared with some other
automation software, zenon was
incredibly easy to pick up,Ž explained
Glyn Thomas, sales consultant at DBIS.
Of course, there is always
ÛÜÌØÖÙØ×Î×ÝÜÒÜ
öøóóòõ÷ìñê
äñìññòùä÷ìùèö÷äõ÷¡øóåü
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concentrate on the beta trial
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small parts or batteries at the
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WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
JANUARY 2018
NEWS
EUREKA!
ÖÊ×ÊÐÎÖÎ×ÝËÞâ´ØÞÝ
PRECISION SHEET METAL
manufacturer, Fife Fabrications,
ëäööèæøõèçäöèùèñ¡
êøõèéøñçìñê
deal from Royal Bank of Scotland to
äööìö÷÷ëèæòðóäñüìñøñçèõ÷äîìñêä
ðäñäêèðèñ÷åøü¡òø÷
The company will now be owned
äñçòóèõä÷èçåüì÷öéòøõõèðäìñìñê
çìõèæ÷òõöÓòëñÙèñðäñÌõäìê
McIntosh, Steven Smith and Roberto
Morris, after they were supported by
RBS to purchase the business from
majority shareholder, Archie Smith,
upon his retirement.
RBS has also assisted
÷ëèæòðóäñüìñæõèä÷ìñêäñç
ìðóïèðèñ÷ìñêä÷ëõèè¡üèäõåøöìñèöö
plan that focuses on employee
çèùèïòóðèñ÷äñçäñòñêòìñê
æòððì÷ðèñ÷÷òìñùèö÷ìñêìñæø÷÷ìñê¡
èçêè÷èæëñòïòêü
John Penman, director of Fife
Fabrications, said: The support
from Royal Bank of Scotland has
åèèñìñùäïøäåïèìñäçùìöìñêòñòøõ
ðäñäêèðèñ÷åøü¡òø÷óõòêõèööìñê
òøõåøöìñèööóïäñäñçèñöøõìñêúè
continue to add value.Ž
Ben Honeyman, relationship
director at Royal Bank of Scotland,
öäìç \fÒ÷ëäöåèèñõèúäõçìñê÷ò
work with a company so invested
in its people and customers. An
äæ÷ìùèðèðåèõòéÍèùèïòóìñê÷ëè
âòøñêàòõîéòõæèÏìéèÏäåõìæä÷ìòñö
óõòùìçèöòñêòìñêöøóóòõ÷
for apprenticeships and skills
development in the area.
The business has an extremely
positive impact on its local
community and we wish the team
òñêòìñêöøææèöö\r
MOVERS &
SHAKERS
NEW CHIEF
EXECUTIVE FOR
MERIDIAN
Dr Daniel Ruiz has been
appointed to the role of chief
executive of Meridian, the
£100 million connected and
autonomous vehicle
acceleration programme,
which was launched in
September 2017. Dr Ruiz
takes over leadership from
launch director, Jim Campbell,
who has successfully
completed his assignment to
establish the organisation.
VERT ROTORS
FOUNDER MAKES
TOP 100 LIST
The founder and CEO of
Edinburgh-based Vert Rotors,
Olly Dmitriev, has been
named in the Manufacturer
Magazines UKs Top 100
most inspiring individuals in
the manufacturing sector.
Dmitriev, who was also named
Inventor of the Year at the
2017 Made in Scotland
Awards, invented the worlds
smallest low-vibration
compressor for a range of
applications including space
and terrestrial applications.
SUPPLY CHAIN
PRESIDENT
Electrocomponents has
appointed Debbie Lentz as
president global supply chain.
She will be responsible for
leading the further
development of the Groups
supply chain capability. With
her leadership team, Lentz is
÷äöîèçúì÷ëçèñìñêäñç
implementing a strategy to
æõèä÷èäèûìåïèäñç
responsive supply chain for
customers and suppliers.
ÜØÕÞÝÒØ×ÝØÕÊÜÝÖØ×ÝÑÜ
COFFEE TIME
CHALLENGE
Ýëèöòïø÷ìòñ÷òïäö÷ðòñ÷ëöæëäïïèñêèòéëòú÷òö÷òóöòðèòñèúì÷ë
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úìïïðäîèüòøïäøêëä÷÷ëèúèäõèõì÷ëäöóõòùèñ÷òëèïó÷ëòöèúì÷ë÷ëè
impediment to keep the snorts and throat wheezes to a minimum.
Ýëèòñè¡óìèæèæëìñö÷õäóìöçèöìêñèç÷òëòïç÷ëèíäúìñäö÷äåïè
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ìñúäõçåõèä÷ëñèæèööäõüéòõäñèæëòìñêöñòõèìöö÷òóóèçåèéòõèì÷
åèêìñö
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ÛÎÖóëäöèöòðè÷ëìñêçìæøï÷÷òäæëìèùèúëèñ÷ëèöñòõèèìö÷øõñìñê
it up to 11.
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öòïø÷ìòñö$%òø÷òé%ö÷äõöäö÷ëèäùèõäêèõèùìèú
COVER STORY
F1 & INDUSTRY
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
JANUARY 2018
rom the 1950s to early 1960s
F1 cars raced in national
colours. British cars like
Lotus ran in British racing
green, Italian cars like Ferrari were
painted Rosso Corsa and French cars
were Bleu de France. The exception,
of course, was Mercedes, which
eschewed Germanys white paint
scheme altogether and raced with
bare metal to save weight.
By 1967, however, running an F1
team and developing a competitive
car was becoming an unworkable
expense. It marked a new era of
sponsorship in the sport that began
with the Lotus 49, the  rst Grand Prix
car to not only feature logos, but also
a title sponsor that dictated the colour
of the car. Gold Leaf … a tobacco
company … signed the lucrative deal,
which stipulated the car adopt its
colour scheme of red, cream and
gold rather than British racing
green.
Since then technology
development and running
costs have skyrocketed,
and sponsorship has
become a de facto
part of modern F1. Top
teams need a budget of
around  450 million to be
competitive, with up to 75%
coming from sponsors. Less
competitive teams operate with
a much lower budget, around  150
million with 50% coming from third
parties.
So, apart from the marketing
collateral of sponsorship deals getting
valuable air-time on TV screens
around the world, what do sponsors
get from the deal? The 
rst thing
to note is that most F1 teams have
sponsors and also partners. For the
most part, sponsorship gives access
to drivers for adverts, branding on the
car and drivers overalls, and perhaps
access to hospitality tents and the pits
on race weekends. In short, it allows
corporations to associate themselves
with the F1 limelight.
For many smaller technology
rms in UK industry, however, F1
partnerships offer a much lower cost
to entry and companies can get their
technology pushed to the limit by
some of the worlds fastest moving and
most capable engineers, mechanics,
designers and drivers. Its far from
one way traf c though, as teams rely
on their partners technologies to
give them the tools that will make
a car more competitive. Teams are
constantly on the lookout for small
innovations that could have an impact
and can regularly be seen around the
oors of UK engineering shows.
Stratasys is in the  rst of a four-
year technical partnership
with McLaren Honda after
the team bought its 
rst
Stratasys machine in September 2016.
McLaren now has nine machines
installed from the Fortus 900,
Stratasys largest FDM machine, to
the more portable Fortus 450 that
the team takes to each race in case it
needs parts printed straight away.
The bene
t for Stratasys is
that McLaren needs very speci
properties from the materials that it
uses to make the components on its
cars. High stiffness to weight ratios are
required for structural components,
for example, and suspension
materials must be 
ne-tuned to 
nd a
balance of  exibility and toughness.
To this end, McLaren constantly beta-
tests a range of materials that can
In the world of Formula One, what do the companies
whose logos adorn the vehicles get out of the deal, and
ëòúçòèöúìçèõìñçøö÷õüåèñè÷éõòð÷ëìööüðåìò÷ìæ
relationship? Tom Austin-Morgan reports.
Red Bull Racing has
early visibility of
beta-code, allowing
engineers to report
back any bugs before
general release
Traditional
industries
are working
within
to develop
rapid design
and change
management
capabilities
to
shorten
product
development
cycles
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
have uses far from the pit lanes of the
worlds racetracks.
Amos Breyfogle, lead technical
consultant at Stratasys, says: Having
people like McLaren explain to us
what they need, and solving that
problem, means theyre really driving
our technology roadmap.
They use carbon 
bre 
lled
nylon for a hydraulic bracket. That
is an incredibly stiff material for the
weight, and its something we can
reliably produce for other industries
as well, like orthopaedic inserts,
prosthetics or end of arm grippers for
manufacturing equipment. The data
we get from the F1 side feeds into
countless other industries. So, for us,
the partnership is much bigger than
just F1.Ž
RAPID DEVELOPMENT
The Red Bull Racing Formula One
Team uses software from ANSYS
and Siemens for simulation, design
and communications. Siemens
Teamcenter and NX PLM software
are used to design everything from
the individual components that make
up the chassis of the cars right down
to the crates used to transport tools,
parts and sub-assemblies from track
to track around the world.
Red Bull has an extremely fast
paced design cycle between races
and seasons, with a very large
number of design iterations,Ž explains
Jan Larsson, senior marketing director
EMEA at Siemens PLM Software. As
such, they can in uence what our
nal products are going to look like
because were always working to
optimise the way in which engineers
interact with our software from a
work
ow point of view to cut down on
unnecessary work.Ž
Larsson says Red Bull has early
visibility of Siemens beta-code,
typically about
10 months
before a product
is released.
INDUSTRY
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
COVER STORY
F1 & INDUSTRY
As such, Red Bull engineers and
designers 
ag up any bugs that
surface in the code so they can be
xed before the software makes it to
general release.
He adds that Formula One isnt
the only industry that requires
up to the second data analysis.
Increasingly, traditional industries
are demanding rapid design and
change management capabilities
as companies shorten product
development cycles and look to offer
more product variants.
ANSYS also provides Red Bull
Racing with beta-versions of its
Fluent CFD software to help with the
aerodynamic design of its cars but
also to push the software to the limits
of its capabilities and often beyond.
Working with a Formula One
team comes with big challenges,Ž
says Andy Wade, lead application
engineer at ANSYS. Its tricky
because their use case is massive.Ž
Part of the problem for
ANSYS and Red Bull
Racing is that the
simulations are
so large and
complex they
cant be run
on a single
computer.
It means a
cluster of
computers
needs to
be used, which essentially means
multiple computers connected
and working together to solve the
problem. The sheer size, computation
and datasets needed for these
advanced simulations often push both
the software and hardware to the
limit.
A lot of their design challenges
dont tend to scale down to
workstation sized cases,Ž says Wade.
It means you really need to be on a
cluster to overcome the issues theyre
facing.
Ive been working with F1 teams
for more than 10 years and theyre
always well ahead of us in terms of
hardware and capability. Sometimes
they can send you cases and you just
think Oh my god, what are we going
to do with this?Ž
Additionally, due to restrictions
by the FIA on how much data a team
is allowed to crunch through during
a season, as well as the fact that
current designs are highly
sensitive, Red Bull
Racing cant send
ANSYS current
design problems.
Generally,
the use case
geometries
they can share
are around 30
months old …
which,
F1 MATERIALS
USED IN THE
MEDICAL INDUSTRY
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ìñ÷ëèëèäï÷ëæäõèìñçøö÷õü
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æäñëäùè÷ëèìõëèäçöæäññèç÷òóõòçøæè
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æòðóïè÷èúì÷ëëäõçåòñèöòé÷öîìñäñç
åïòòçùèööèïöÝëìöðòçèïæäñ÷ëèñ
åèøöèçåüöøõêèòñö÷òóõäæ÷ìæè÷ëè
õèðòùäïóõòæèçøõèöò÷ëèüæäñäööèöö
äñüçìæøï÷ìèö÷ëèüðäüéäæèåèéòõè
óèõéòõðìñêöøõêèõüòñ÷ëèóä÷ìèñ÷
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ëèïóèçøö÷èö÷
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äïïòúìñêøö÷ò
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úìçèõäøçìèñæè
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COVER STORY
F1 & INDUSTRY
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
JANUARY 2018
in F1 terms, is
ancient history …
upon which ANSYS
would reproduce
the issues and
combat them.
Again, the
relationship
between ANSYS
and Red Bull
Racing is a
partnership,
meaning that
Red Bull Racing
engineers are
meticulous in
reporting bugs in
the code of the
software before
it reaches wider
industry.
Developers from
both companies share
information and best
practice, meaning some of
Red Bull Racings IP 
nds its way
into the alpha code of Fluent.
BESPOKE DESIGN
SKF has been involved with F1 for 70
years and supports most, if not all, of
the teams on the grid with a multitude
of bearings and condition monitoring
equipment.
One of the biggest challenges for
SKFs dedicated Racing Unit is the
speed at which the teams want to
design, develop and test its products.
Almost every bearing the
company supplies into Formula
One is 100% bespoke for the
team and the application. The
standard lead time for a fully-
bespoke bearing is a couple of
months, however if a bearing
needs to be replaced after it
has failed at a race weekend,
SKF normally has a maximum
of two weeks to create a
replacement.
Its quite different to
any other industry in that
respect,Ž says Guy
Miller, a key account
manager at SKFs
Racing Unit. In
Formula One were
generally asked
for things that we
might think from the
outset are impossible
to achieve, particularly
with things like short lead
times.
But, when factories have
done it once for F1, they realise that
they really can make something that
quickly. So, when another customer
outside of racing asks to do the
same thing we already know its
possible. Without that experience
with Formula One wed have written
it off from the outset and said, it cant
be done.Ž
The most recent area in which
racing technology has trickled out
into other industries is ceramic
rolling elements. Racing was the
rst industry to develop ceramics
with SKF around 10 years ago but
now ceramic bearings are used
in buses, trains and trams with
signi
cant interest being shown by
the aerospace industry.
Our ceramic rolling element
production is going from 300,000 to
3 million,Ž says Miller. If you look
a couple of years in the future that
technology will be out and in use by
all kinds of industrial applications.Ž
HIGH SPEED WORK ETHIC
The pace at which Formula One
engineers work, develop and apply
technology re ects the breakneck right
on the limit performance that drivers
exhibit during a race. It is by far the most
aggressive in the automotive sector
and just about anywhere in industry.
This, it seems, is the biggest challenge
and reward for the various partnering
technology companies involved.
The partner names and logos
emblazoned on the chassis of F1 cars
are a badge of honour for engineers,
proving they met the stringent time
demands placed upon them. In such
a high-pro le sport, this is a massive
validation of technical ability. It means
that all-important television airtime
provides not just brand awareness
to keep the marketing department
happy, but also acts as a ringing
endorsement for the engineers
involved on a huge platform from
which to shout about it.
3D printing steering
wheels allows the
complicated layout
of buttons to be
optimised for drivers
ON THE TOPIC OF
SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
JANUARY 2018
ounded in 2003, DtM is
a non-prot organisation
committed to innovative
design that helps improve
healthcare in underprivileged
communities. The organisation
began focusing on medical devices
in 2010 … collaborating with leading
social entrepreneurs and hundreds
of volunteers to solve problems in
global health.
DtM is recognised as an
international leader in human-centred
design, rapid prototyping and low-
volume manufacturing, which allows
the team to deliver breakthrough
global health technologies to niche
markets at a fraction of the traditional
R&D investment.
For DtM, rapid prototyping is
crucial. The process gives the
company the freedom to experiment
with numerous iterations of the overall
medical device form factor, user
interface and key components. And,
with the right hardware, this process
reduces product development time.
DtM recently started using the
Lenovo ThinkStation P900 series,
which allows them to generate three
or four renderings in the time it used
to take to do one. This turnaround is
mission-critical to ensure the team
can more quickly conduct user-
testing in the eld with doctors and
patients to ensure theyre delivering
what they really need.
One example of this collaboration
is DtMs work with medical device
company Medical Technology
Transfer and Services (MTTS).
Since 2009, MTTS has used its local
connections to direct DtM to hospitals
in need for testing new medical
devices. Now, DtM comes back to
those hospitals to test new device
prototypes knowing doctors and
patients will provide honest feedback
that results in speedy adoption.
Over the years DtM has developed
several notable devices including;
Pelican, a portable pulse oximeter
that allows low-skilled community
health workers to quickly diagnose
newborn pneumonia; Otter, a
simple and easily cleaned newborn
conductive warmer helping prevent
hypothermia; and Firey, a newborn
phototherapy device for low-resource
hospitals helping treat jaundice,
which has been used by over 35,000
newborns in more than 20 countries
to date.
Based on experience, DtM has
learned that people arent going
to use a device unless it works
within their context. Medical device
standards are often written for US,
European and Japanese use but when
devices are placed in a rural hospital
in Africa there are often challenges
to local adoption. For instance,
large pieces of equipment with tiny
casters assumes smooth oors and
working elevators, which are often
uncommon in underprivileged
countries. To ensure products meet
the needs of communities, DtM takes
three steps: identify the opportunity,
conduct design research and build
partnerships.
First, the team looks at how the
design of a device contributes to
healing sick patients. Then the team
researches everything including how
to solicit feedback from countries
that do not speak their language.
To get the answers they need, the
DtM team must know how to work
with translators, frame questions
and understand techniques for
illuminating gaps between what
people say and what they really do.
One of the biggest challenges
we see is that needs dont always
ENGINEERING A
BETTER WORLD
Around the world, millions of newborns are at risk of lifelong disability and even
death from easily treatable conditions. Solving these kinds of problems is what
ðò÷ìùä÷èöÍèöìêñ÷ëä÷Öä÷÷èõö¤Í÷Ö¥Óøö÷ìñÌøññìñêëäðñçöòø÷ðòõè
A newborn
phototherapy device
helping treat jaundice
in low-resource
hospitals.
There are disconnects between the organisations or
individuals that fund healthcare, those that select the
medical equipment and those that use it.Ž
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
equal markets.Ž says Timothy
Prestero, CEO of Design that Matters.
There are disconnects between
the organisations or individuals that
fund healthcare, those that select the
medical equipment and those that
use it.
On top of this, hospitals routinely
receive donations of equipment they
cannot use. In fact, the World Health
Organization estimates that up to 80%
of donated medical equipment is
never used.Ž
To combat this issue, Prestero and
his team work closely with people in
the communities they serve to ensure
that every stakeholder is involved
from the very beginning to avoid
any miscommunication between the
creators and the users. With this in
mind, the team is able to consistently
provide devices that meet the needs
of those they serve.
To design these life-saving
devices, DtM requires technology
and hardware that is reliable
anywhere … from its headquarters to
rural clinics across the world. Along
with its ThinkStation P900 series,
Lenovos mobile workstations offer
DtM exibility to do work in the eld,
allowing its members to share design
updates on the y.
Were not sitting in an ofce
developing product, were out in the
eld understanding the environment
it will be used in,Ž says Prestero.
Because of this, our hardware must
be indestructible, with tremendous
power so we can prototype quickly …
and ultimately get the devices to them
to start saving lives.Ž
DtM is a small organisation making
a huge impact with the help of the
right technology and hardware. The
non-prot also recruits numerous
volunteers and students … exposing
them to problems faced by poor
communities and empowering them
to realign their life trajectories to focus
on careers in the social sector.
DtM is committed to increasing
our results and impact by building
the next generation of social impact
designers,Ž says Prestero. We have
a growing network of over 1,200
staff and volunteer alumni who have
embraced the organisations mission,
and we will continue to recruit and
train these future social sector leaders
through our open, collaborative
design process.Ž
So, whats next? DtM may be
developing ground-breaking devices
now, but its overall vision is that each
product developed will become the
standard of care in low-resource
settings. Once this happens, the non-
prot will have the ability to focus
resources on even more high-burden
global health needs.
Prestero concludes: We want to
design for outcomes. Our mission isnt
to make beautiful stuff … its to make
the world a better place.Ž
DtM is a small
organisation making
a huge impact with
the help of the right
technology and
hardware.
RAPID PROTOTYPING
MEDICAL
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
dditive manufacturing is
a burgeoning technology
in hospital environments.
In the last few years, there
has been a signi cant shift towards
patient speci
c implants (PSIs), which
previously would have only been
used for very complex cases. Today,
they are beginning to slowly be used
in everyday practise.
PSIs can be produced by
additive manufacturing (AM) in
several different materials for
medical applications, and it should
be remembered that AM is still a
relatively new technology for the
medical sector.
AM offers several bene
ts over
traditionally made implants, including
fewer geometric limitations on
implant design. Implants created
using AM technology are built
in layers from powdered metal
resulting in fewer restrictions on what
can be manufactured. What were
extremely complex structures are
straightforward to manufacture
using AM.
ADOPTING AM IMPLANTS
AM implants are now commonly
used in Southmead Hospital, Bristol,
for craniomaxillofacial (CMF)
procedures.
Prior to adopting the AM implant
technology, the prosthetics team
would produce a 3D model of the
patients skull from a mould made
of dental plaster and stone. This
would be used to press a
sheet of titanium to form the
implant.
Additive manufacturing
eliminates the need to
make a mould as the
implant is produced on an
AM machine using digital
data, speeding up both the
design and manufacture
processes.
Models required for
surgical planning can also be
printed from a patients CT data
and can be integrated with surgical
planning software to produce a
digital 3D visualisation.
From my experience, I have found
it very straightforward to adapt to
the new technology. However, it is
important that work continues to
develop on more advanced software
packages, as current options require
highly trained and experienced
members of staff to do the design.
In Southmead Hospital, we use a
platform called Geomagic Freeform
Plus to design the implants.
In future, software packages such
as ADEPT, available from Renishaw,
will make the design process even
more straightforward. ADEPT is
computer-aided design software
that has been speci
cally
created for the rapid design of
craniomaxillofacial, PSIs by
metal 3D printing.
Once an implant
has been designed,
the hospital can
send the design to a
third-party company,
such as Renishaw, for
manufacture. Additive
manufacturing produces
precise guides, models and
implants to the surgeons
IMPROVING
EXPERIENCE
The use of metal-based additive manufacturing
machines in hospitals is allowing medical professionals
to pioneer the use of custom made implants for use
within the NHS. Eureka! reports.
Once an
implant
has been
designed, the hospital
can
send the design
to
a third-party company,
such as Renishaw, for
manufacture
RAPID PROTOTYPING
MEDICAL
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
JANUARY 2018
the surgeon can pre-plan before
surgery. Custom AM surgical guides
and implants are also created
before surgery. The guides allow
the surgeon to remove the tumour
and place the cranial plate, in one
surgical procedure, with precision.
Improved surgical planning
streamlines the surgery process
leading to a reduction in theatre
time, which in turn can reduce NHS
costs.
In order for the technology to
reach its potential, industry
and healthcare need to work
together to progress it further by
developing a body of evidence
demonstrating the efcacy and
benets both to the hospital and
patients.
It is also important that early
adopters of the technology, such
as the team in Southmead Hospital,
apply their knowledge to drive the
technology forward to also reinforce
that the additive manufacturing
of implants could improve not just
patient care but could also be of
nancial benet to
health services.
specication, which can improve
the outcome for the patient as it
allows for a quicker procedure, less
surgery time and an accurate t with
good aesthetics.
OPENING DOORS
Additively manufactured implants
are helping to improve treatment
processes and decrease procedure
revision numbers and times, which
can also reduce costs for the NHS
and provide better patient outcomes.
There can be greater benets in
more complex cases, however AM
technology can still help to streamline
surgery for less complex procedures.
Surgeons are able to carry out careful
pre-planning, which means they have
reduced spans of problem solving
during surgery.
The implants offer improved
treatment processes for patients. One
major advantage is the reduction in
the number of procedures a patient
may need. Traditionally, if a patient
had a particular cranium tumour, a
surgeon would rst have to remove
the tumour and close the wound. The
patient would then require further
CT scans to determine the size of the
cranial plate needed. The surgeon
would then perform a second
procedure to insert the implant.
By using surgical planning
software and AM technology,
Replacement jaw implants
have been made to treat
temporomandibular joint
endoprostheses, which severely
reduces many facial senses.
Typically, implants are made
from medical Grade-5 titanium
alloy Ti6Al4V by direct laser
metal sintering. For its surgical
guides and implant models,
a biocompatible polymer PA
2200 (also known as Nylon-12) is
selective laser sintered.
Medical CT scans are the
basis for preparing the CAD
model, while inspection of
AM parts is carried out with a
Nikon Metrology industrial, high
voltage, micro-CT scanner.
ÖìïçäÓòîüðäì÷ü÷æïìñìæäï
engineer at Ortho Baltic
explains: To create anatomical
models, 3D reconstruction
engineers use the patients
radiological data to perform a 3D
reconstruction.Ž
A Nikon Metrology XT H 225
micro-CT scanner is used to
ðòñì÷òõ÷ëèôøäïì÷üòé÷ëèñäï
part and inspect the external
geometry and internal structure.
The inspection uses a 225kV
micro-focus source that non-
destructively reveals any voids,
cracks and other defects of
the complex internal features
of the AM
components.
Domantas
Ozerenskis,
product quality
manager at Ortho
Baltic, adds: Micro-CT
scanning is the only way to non-
destructively check for voids
and cracks inside a part.
We considered a coordinate
measuring machine, but it is
inconvenient for taking non-
parametric measurements and
there is no possibility for inner
structure investigation.
The internal quality of
implants is very important, as it
determines the parts
mechanical strength.Ž
After 3D metal printing, post-
processes such as sandblasting
and polishing can remove thick
surface layers up to 200µm …
even more in the case of other
manual processes. It means
micro-CT data can also help
äçíøö÷ÌÊÍðòçèïö÷òõèèæ÷ä
óäõ÷öñäïêèòðè÷õü\b
ABOUT
THE
AUTHOR
Amy Davey is a
reconstructive
scientist at North
Bristol NHS Trust.
CT SCAN DATA DRIVES IMPLANT DESIGN
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
POWER TRANSMISSION
EFFICIENCY
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
JANUARY 2018
t might well be the beginning of the
end for ICEs, but make no mistake,
it will not be a quick death. Expect
petrol, and possibly diesel,
engines to continue to play a decisive
role within the automotive industry for
at least the next 10 years.
Iterative improvements within
ICEs have predominantly come
from smaller component part
improvements, such as bearings, but
also in the precise and adjustable
control of components like valves.
The aim of many engine makers
today is to take out the variability
that a driver can have
on emissions and
efciency, without
taking over or
limiting the
amount of
acceleration
available.
Precision
engineering
manufacturer,
Schaefer, has
been a long-
term supplier
of engine
components
and over the
years it has
increasingly taken
on more of the
development work
for engine builders.
The rm has been
working on different
types of variable valve
trains and has long
made a distinction between valve
train systems with variable phases
and those with variable lift.
It says, variable camshaft phasing
units that adjust the phases can
inuence exhaust gas recirculation
and the effective compression ratio.
Meanwhile, systems with variable
lift can have a discrete two- or three-
step lift actuation or be fully-variable
depending on the throttle input
during acceleration. The conclusion
is that fully-variable mechanical valve
trains such as BMWs Valvetronic
cant meet future challenges alone.
In
2009,
Schaefer
began volume
production of
UniAir, the worlds
rst fully-variable
electrohydraulic
valve control system. Its
latest generation, however,
will broaden its appeal by
allowing vehicles in the upper-
class automotive market to operate
more economically and with lower
emissions.
UniAir operates by controlling
engine valves based on the
drive cycle that matches
engine operations to
specic situations
and requirements.
In essence, the
technology makes
it possible to
achieve laboratory
efciency gures
in the real world, meaning
signicant reductions in
fuel consumption and
emissions, regardless of
driving style. Its claimed
the system reduces fuel
consumption by 10 %,
increases power by 10 %
and torque by 15 % in the
lower speed range while complying
with the requirements of the Euro 6
emissions standards.
We are continuously developing
UniAir technology in order to
meet the increasing demands of
CRITICAL
TIMING
Despite the internal combustion engine
¤ÒÌÎ¥æòðìñêøñçèõõèìñõèæèñ÷ðòñ÷ëö
it hasnt stopped ongoing work to make
äïïÒÌÎöæïèäñèõäñçðòõèèæìèñ÷
Óøö÷ìñÌøññìñêëäðñçöòø÷ëòú
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
our customers to produce engines
that reduce fuel consumption
and emissions,Ž says Professor
Peter Pleus, the chief executive of
Automotive at Schaef
er. Since
its development, market interest in
the system has steadily increased.
The fact that other automotive
manufacturers are using this
innovative technology provides us
with a source of recognition and of
motivation to continue along this
path.Ž
By using UniAir, controlling the
modern combustion processes, such
as Miller and Atkinson cycles, can
also be realised in accordance with
manufacturers requirements. The
modi
ed Atkinson cycle uses late
intake valve closing (LIVC) and the
Miller cycle extreme early intake
valve closing (EIVC) to increase fuel
economy.
The latest generation of UniAir
technology combines for the 
rst
time two hydraulic camshaft phasing
units. This additional degree of
freedom offered by the system with
its optimised mass
design means that
the engine can
operate in an
even broader
spectrum of
the engine
data map
with optimum
ef
ciency.
Another
advantage of
the technology is
the fast and precise
control of the valves to
match the relevant cycle, which
allows an instant increase in torque
without impairing the ef
ciency of
the engine due to the signi
cant
retardation of the ignition timing.
Ron Lee, powertrain director
within the development department
of Jaguar, explains: The new
generation of Ingenium diesel
engines are wholly designed
and manufactured in-house. No
opportunity has been missed
in ensuring their design is right
on the cutting edge of technical
advancement.Ž
With the new Ingenium diesel
engines driving the rear wheels, the
aluminium-intensive XE is the most
fuel-ef
cient Jaguar yet, with CO
emissions from just 99g/km. The
new XE will feature two versions of
the 2.0-litre Ingenium diesel. The
rst, rated at 163PS/380Nm, delivers
benchmark ef
ciency 
gures of
75mpg and 99g/km CO
without any
compromise to launch performance
or mid-range acceleration. The
180PS/430Nm variant has one of the
highest torque outputs in the class.
Variable exhaust valve timing
also shortens the catalyst light-
off phase and improves diesel
particulate  lter (DPF) regeneration.
The cooled low-pressure exhaust
gas recirculation (EGR) system
reduces combustion chamber
temperatures, inhibiting NOx
formation. Selective catalytic
reduction (SCR) technology
cuts NOx emissions to very low
levels and the new XE has been
engineered to meet the most
stringent global regulations.
The Ingenium range is produced
at JLRs £500 million, 100,000m
Engine Manufacturing Centre in the
West Midlands.
CONSTANT AND
ÒÖÙÊÌÝ´ÏÛÎÎÝØÛÚÞÎ
Mayr Power Transmission has developed a
product tailored to the requirements of PET
ïïìñêóïäñ÷ö÷òäóóïüóïäö÷ìæöæõèúæäóöúì÷ë
pre-formed threads onto the plastic bottles so
÷ëä÷÷ëèüæïòöè÷ìêë÷ïüåø÷æäñåèèäöìïüòóèñèç
later on.
Ûøö÷óõòòéëüö÷èõèöìöÛØËÊ¡æäóóìñêëèäç
çèùìæèöêèñèõä÷èäæòñö÷äñ÷äñçìðóäæ÷¡
éõèè÷òõôøèçøè÷òì÷öðäêñè÷ìææïø÷æë÷ëä÷
úòõîöäææòõçìñê÷ò÷ëèëüö÷èõèöìöóõìñæìóïèÒñ
ñòõðäïòóèõä÷ìòñì÷÷õäñöðì÷ö÷ëèöè÷÷òõôøè
synchronously from an input onto an output
èïèðèñ÷Ýëè÷òõôøèìöêèñèõä÷èç÷ëõòøêë
ðäêñè÷ìæéòõæèöúëìæëäõèóõòçøæèçåü
óèõðäñèñ÷ðäêñè÷öäñçúëìæëðäêñè÷ìöè
ëüö÷èõèöìöðä÷èõìäïöÑèõè÷ëè÷òõôøè
transmission takes place contactlessly.
Ýëèðäêñè÷ìææïø÷æëéèä÷øõèööüñæëõòñòøö
õøññìñêðèäñìñê÷ëä÷ì÷çòèöñò÷öïìóØñïüä÷
÷ëèèñçòé÷ëèæäóóìñêóõòæèööúëèñ÷ëèæäó
has been screwed on does the clutch slip at the
predetermined torque.
Ñèõè÷ëèëüö÷èõèöìö÷èæëñòïòêüèñöøõèö
contactless and therefore wear-free torque
÷õäñöðìööìòñðèäñìñêñòæòñ÷äðìñä÷ìòñìö
êèñèõä÷èç÷ëõòøêëéõìæ÷ìòñúëìæëìöìçèäïéòõøöè
in the food industry.
\fÝëèÛØËÊ¡æäóóìñê¡ëèäçäæëìèùèöäëìêë
torque consistency and repetitive accuracy
÷ëõòøêëäöóèæìäïæòñ÷äæ÷ïèöööèäïïäåüõìñ÷ë\r
öäüöØöîäõÏïèìöæëðäññäõèöèäõæëäñç
çèùèïòóðèñ÷èñêìñèéõòðÖäüõÙòúèõ
Ýõäñöðìööìòñ\fÝëèöèöèäïìñêöüö÷èðöìñ\b
øèñæè
÷ëèæäóóìñê÷òõôøèåò÷ë÷ëõòøêëöóèèçäñç
÷èðóèõä÷øõè\b
øæ÷øä÷ìòñöäñç÷ëõòøêëéõìæ÷ìòñ
ùäïøèæëäñêèöìñæäöèòéäêìñêäñçúèäõòñ÷ëè
öèäïìñêèïèðèñ÷ö
\fØøõæäóóìñêæïø÷æëèöäïöòéèä÷øõèä
substantially softer torque build-up than
æòñùèñ÷ìòñäïæòððèõæìäïóõòçøæ÷öúëìæë
èñöøõèöäåè÷÷èõæäóóìñêõèöøï÷äñçäïöò
õèçøæèö÷ëèùìåõä÷ìòñöäïòñê÷ëèèñ÷ìõè
çõìùèïìñè\r
The clutch is available in a
rustproof stainless-
steel .
Fast
and
precise
control of the
valves
allows an
increase
in
torque
without impairing
æìèñæü
due to the
öìêñì
æäñ÷
retardation
of the
ignition
timing
LINEAR ACTUATORS
SELECTION
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
JANUARY 2018
inear actuators are used
in many applications
around industry.
Pneumatic, hydraulic
and electromechanical
technologies are the primary
options for providing linear
actuation but the selection
and use of these technologies
depends greatly on technical
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
mechanical components
to add backlash,
torsional wind-up, or
other positioning errors.
Sub-micron resolution and
repeatability are achievable and
as the motor is directly coupled to
the load, there are fewer components
to fail, which adds long-term
reliability.
BALLSCREWS
Most linear motion applications,
including positioning tables, convert
motor torque to linear thrust using
ballscrews. They are characterised
by high thrust (up to 9000N) and
they generate high speeds at
shorter stroke lengths … up to 1.8m/s.
Ballscrews can be precise from 10
to 50mm and some manufacturers
rate them for 100 to 2,500km of total
lifetime travel.
Sometimes, their bearings ride
on the  ights or leads of the screw for
95% ef
ciency or better.
Rolled ballscrews are lower cost,
whereas ground ballscrews deliver
higher critical speeds. In some
models, re-engineered recirculating
ball tubes are designed especially for
screws, including lubrication seals on
the ball nut end, which reduces noise
as much as 7dB.
ROLLER SCREWS
This is the most recent evolution of
the ballscrew. The latest roller screws
incorporate multiple roller bearings in
the nut, which operate like planetary
gears around the screw itself. Roller
screws provide high ef
ciency,
duty cycles exceeding 50%, and
acceleration from 1 to 2G. Typical
stroke lengths range from 5mm to 2m;
speeds can reach 1.8m/s. In short,
roller screws have the speeds of
ballscrews, but possess much higher
thrust capacity and force density.
Roller screws are used in many
small machine presses and injection
moulding machines. The downside
of roller screw technology is its low
availability because the technology
is relatively new, so lead-time and
prices are generally signi
cantly
higher than ballscrews.
ACME SCREWS
Acme screws, also known
as lead screws, are
one of the simplest and
lowest cost mechanisms
for converting rotary
power to linear. However,
because there are no rolling
ball bearings, they transfer
only 30 to 50% of the motors
energy to driving the load. The
remaining energy is lost to friction
and generated heat. Heat limits the
duty cycle of Acme screws to less
than 50%. Despite this, Acme screws
are useful for applications with low
speeds and duty cycles below 50%,
and those that must hold position
while the motor power is off „ such
as while holding a vertical load.
BELT DRIVES
Belt drives offer many of the bene
ts
of ballscrews, but have fewer moving
parts and no critical speed limitations,
making it suitable for higher travel
speeds with minimal component
wear. Belt drive designs, however,
have lower repeatability and
accuracy.
Some product designs allow
tensioning at the carriage. Others
allow tensioning at the idler end cap
of the actuator, because it eliminates
the need to remove any load while
tensioning the belt.
MAKING A
MEASURED CHOICE
Designers can take four main
categories of requirements into
consideration when choosing a
linear actuator: Precision, Expected
life, Throughput and Special
considerations (PETS). For example,
if precision is considered to be
the most important factor, a linear
drive or a precision ball screw will
be more suitable for the job, but is
likely to be more expensive. Where
precision is not a high priority, a belt
drive may prove to do the job more
economically.
Placing a priority on one type of
application parameter could mean
that performance in another area
might be sacri ced, but nevertheless
all the decision making categories
should be carefully weighed up
before making the  nal choice of
actuator equipment.
Selecting
linear
actuators
for an
application greatly
depends on
technical
knowledge
, budgets,
available energy
sources, and
performance
Picture Credit: [06photo]/Getty Images
SENSORS
INDUSTRY 4.0
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
JANUARY 2018
e all get the concept
of Industry 4.0 and the
Internet of Things. But,
while we are told that
the next components we buy are IoT-
ready or Industry 4.0 compatible,
what does it actually mean? It seems
collecting data is one thing, but
making sense of it and unlocking
hidden insight is quite another.
ABBs Motors and Generators is
on a mission to make its motors past
and present not just IoT capable, but
IoT operational by offering an easy
to install retro
ttable sensor known
as the Ability Smart Sensor. But, how
exactly is this different from the idea of
condition monitoring and predicative
maintenance?
Jonas Spoorendonk, global product
manager of the ABB Ability Smart
Sensor, explains: This is not doing
anything that couldnt be done before.
Its just doing it cheaper, better and
making it simpler to install.
This sensor works with any motor
old and new, large or small, variable
or constant. It is an industrial Fitbit that
you put on an electric motor to take
measurements with cheap and simple
equipment to calculate what that
means for the health of the motor.Ž
Broadly speaking, The Ability
Smart Sensor is about optimising
the operation of motors, monitoring
ef
ciencies and minimising the
risk of unplanned and unexpected
downtime.
The wireless sensor is 
tted using
an adhesive putty that is stuffed
between two heat vanes on a pumps
housing, upon which a wedged
shaped bracket is inserted and held
in place. The sensor simply attaches
to the bracket and can be turned on.
It can be installed and running within
10 minutes.
Once attached, the sensor
measures vibration, temperature and
the motors magnetic 
eld, making
measurements once an hour for its
design life of  ve years. Though more
or less frequent measurements are
possible, this correspondingly affects
battery life.
That data is sent via Bluetooth to a
smartphone based app, which is able
to calculate the speed and energy
consumption and log this data over
the long term for easy graphical
comparison.
Only raw data is stored in the
sensor itself, meaning that the app
is needed to analyse the data in
the cloud to calculate the various
performance attributes and provide
analytic insight such as a gradual
decline in ef
ciency that points to the
need for a service or a vibration that
indicates a looming failure.
If you have an engineer walking
around a factory and doing weekly
condition monitoring checks, for
example, in between his checks he
doesnt know what happens,Ž says
Spoorendonk. But now you can have
a measurement every hour and a
trend curve showing historic data that
you can access via the app. And you
can see how a trend is developing
and if anything odd is happening.
This is not replacing the
maintenance professional, but it is
doing things to make them more
ef
cient, gain better insight and allow
EASY
IoT
Condition monitoring and predictive maintenance
are certainly not new, but as the cost of entry drops,
we ask if IoT is really about making the technology
accessible to the masses? Justin Cunningham reports.
The low-cost Ability
Smart Sensor is
easy to install and
provides powerful
analytics and insight.
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
early warnings of future problems.Ž
Engineers simply need to get
within a few metres and connect via
a smartphone or tablet to the sensor
to pick up the data. Many people
are using the sensor as an early
warning system with safety, downtime
reductions and energy saving noted
as the typical bene
ts.
If you shift from reactive to
proactive maintenance,Ž says
Spoorendonk, you can reduce
maintenance by as much as 70%,
extend motor lifetime by as much as
30% and cut energy consumption by
up to 10%.Ž
The sensors work under a traf
light system, so green is operating
normally, amber indicates there could
be a problem, and red means there is
a problem.
Early warning systems help you
to mitigate risk,Ž says Spoorendonk.
Imagine having a  ight recorder on
equipment.
We put this on motors and we can
also put it on the pump. We can even
monitor the transportation during
delivery. If you have a warranty case,
it is there as a  ight recorder. You go
there and pull out the data.Ž
ABB is selling the Ability
Smart Sensor as a retro t kit for
around £300, although the price is
uncon
rmed, and that buys a sensor,
the pieces needed to mount it on
your existing motor and then a two-
year subscription to
ABBs web portal and
smartphone app that
provides the analytics and
insight. After two years,
users have the option to
extend the subscription to the
app and web portal.
However, one question this does
throw up is the common worry of who
owns the data? Its an IoT mine
eld
but ABB want to keep its solution as
simple as possible.
You buy the sensor and receive
it,Ž says Spoorendonk. When you
receive equipment, it is shipped
in 
ight mode. You activate it and
commission it on the motor if its a
retro
t, for example. In that moment,
the data is only sharing data with
you. You have the control. You then
decide who to share it with.
If you are not the end user, Id
imagine the end user will
have an opinion on that as
well. And they might want
visibility of that data too.
Maybe they want to share
the data with us so we
can help, but it is up to
them what they share.Ž
SECURITY
AND STORAGE
The data is stored on the
ABB Ability Cloud, which in
turn is based on Microsoft
Azure. Then, the
communication between
the sensor and the phone
is encrypted and the
communication between
the phone and the cloud is
the same. The cyber security,
according to ABB, is as good as it
gets.
The scalability is nice here,Ž says
Spoorendonk. You dont need to tear
down a factory and rebuild it. You can
get IoT and start with just one motor.
And if you like it add  ve more. Then
add 50 more, or 500, but at some
point it becomes cumbersome to
go around with a mobile phone and
collect data from each individual
sensor so you then get a gateway or
router hanging on the
wall with Bluetooth.
Then you dont need to
collect it yourself.Ž
It is an
industrial Fitbit
that you put on an
electric motor
. This
sensor works with
any
motor
old or new, large
or small,
variable
or
constant
INDUSTRY 4.0
AUGMENTED REALITY
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
JANUARY 2018
AUGMENTING THE
WORKFORCE
If
VR
is
about
improving
visualisation
in the
digital world
and
IoT
about
connectivity
, AR
is about
blending digital
capabilities
with the
physical world
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
hen its reported Apple
is assembling a large
team of specialists in
virtual and augmented
reality (VR/AR) to build headsets to
rival Oculus Rift and Microsofts
Hololens, it suggests there is a shift
towards real commercial deployment.
AR and VR have different use
cases, technologies and market
opportunities. While VR is completely
immersive, with the user entering a
virtual world via a headset which
cannot be seen through, AR overlays
digital imagery onto the real world.
AR, when combined with wearable
technology, can offer a hands-free
computing environment that gives
users a greater level of interaction
between digital information and the
real world. And AR is not just for
gamers or consumers, it is aimed
squarely at technical and skilled
workers from engineers to architects.
IMPLEMENTATION
AR is forecast to go well beyond
Google Glass by enabling increased
collaboration between AR/VR and IoT
developers. If VR is about visualisation
and IoT about connectivity, AR is
about blending our digital capabilities
with the physical world.
Industry is already one of the
strongest adopters of AR, leading to
some reconsidering product plans. In
fact, many businesses are expected to
soon place smart glasses at the core of
their IoT systems, as they look to make
workers more productive and to
streamline their backend operations.
Valerie Riffaud-Cangelosi, new
markets development manager at
Epson, says: Deploying AR will
enable more efcient processes by
enhancing the reality of the user, so
theyll be able, for example, to
maintain an engine or a complex
electrical board in an intuitive and
easy way. Theyll be able to see inside
the device and act on the information
there and then.
Epson unveiled its rst AR product
… the Moverio BT-100 … six years ago.
Today, our BT-300 smart glasses offer
video and access to new AR
experiences for a variety of
commercial and vertical market
applications.Ž
The Moverio BT-300, unveiled at
Mobile World Congress in Barcelona,
2016, employs a variety of
technologies and can project in-line
digital content into the wearers eld of
view.
According to Riffaud-Cangelosi,
the most signicant advance with the
BT-300 is a proprietary micro display
projection system called Si-OLED
(silicon organic light emitting diode),
which can produce deeper and truer
black tones. Thats important because
a true black projected onto lenses of
smart glasses equates to the sense of
colour. Therefore total transparency
means the latest Si-OLED displays are
able to blend projected digital content
more realistically.
The glasses weigh just 60g and the
use of Android 5.1 has expanded the
complexity of the apps that can be
written for the glasses.
FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS
AR headsets are expected to evolve
from the current type of eyewear to
much sleeker devices like contact
lenses and, in the distant future, it
could be possible to make AR
implantable with apps having direct
access to the nervous system.
One key technological challenge,
especially for mobile AR, is packaging
the components into a compact, sleek
and lightweight format that people can
wear comfortably all day. Additionally,
AR headsets must remain cool, which
brings additional power and thermal
constraints.
For a true mobile AR system, there
is still not enough computing power to
create stereo 3D augmented reality
graphics,Ž argues Radhika Arora, ON
Semiconductors IoT product line
manager. Laptops are just about
starting to be equipped with the
necessary graphics processing units
and both sensors and haptics will play
a critical role in future adoption.
For image sensors, getting the
form factor more compact will be key
as well as improving their
performance in varying light
conditions.Ž
But while the future may witness
fashionable eyewear, AR developers
need to focus on a common interface
that integrates with wearables in use
today, whether thats a pair of glasses
or even a smartphone.
AR is still very new, with limited
market penetration,Ž says Adam Kerin,
Qualcomms senior manager of
marketing. But as the technology
advances and the form factor
decreases, we can expect to see it
evolving into a seamless experience
that users will interact with daily.
Were continually adding more
functionality to better support AR use
cases. It is very challenging to
implement because of the processing
complexity and latency issues, along
with requirements for improved
sensors and new display technologies.
A lot of the technologies that are
relevant for smartphones are
applicable for AR, whether it is
computer vision, graphics, image
processing, audio processing, latency
optimisation or low power
processing.Ž
As AR expands from mobile
phones and tablets into wearables, its
crucial that advanced and compute
capable feature sets are retained
whilst silicon area and development
costs are reduced.
Imaginations technologies are
already deployed in a range of glasses
with some AR features and new
technologies like our PowerVR GPUs
enabling more usable and efcient
future generations of wearable AR
devices,Ž says David Harold, senior
director of marketing communications
with Imagination Technologies.
Beyond multimedia, another
important consideration is
connectivity. A lot of AR devices will
incorporate wi and companies can
reduce BoM costs and power
consumption by integrating this
functionality onto a SoC, rather than a
chipset.Ž
Sensors and processors will also
need to be able to effectively process
complex AR functions such as
predictive head motion tracking and
reduce motion to photon latency.
As the technology
around augmented
reality improves,
companies are
increasingly keen
to implement the
technology among
the workforce.
Neil Tyler reports.
Picture Credit: Adobe Stock
DESIGN PLUS
R&D TAX CREDITS
JANUARY 2018
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
he latest Government
statistics show that, to
date, over £14 billion in
R&D tax credits has been
claimed across all sectors but only
a tiny proportion of this has been
claimed by the engineering and
manufacturing sectors.
So, what are R&D tax credits?
Put simply, theyre a Government
initiative to encourage companies
to invest in developing innovative
processes and technologies. And, for
qualifying expenditure, the benet in
claiming can equate to up to 33p for
every £1 of costs incurred.
They can be claimed by
any UK trading company
and the claim is made
annually together
with the company
tax return. If you
have missed
a claim it is
possible to go
back up to two
years to make
one.
There are some
telltale clues that
identify what counts
as R&D in the eyes of
the Government. For a start,
are there specialists working on
a project? If so, are they having to
spend time trying to solve technical
difculties or uncertainties? Do the
contracts contain extensive retention
and indemnity clauses? Any one, or
all, of the above point towards the
potential for R&D qualifying activity
and could be claimed for.
Some text book examples
of R&D work in engineering or
manufacturing include developing
new processes to meet the latest
Government legislation, work that
involves
prototyping,
working
on the
interaction
of two or more
new technologies
or materials,
development of new
equipment to full a project or
other commercial use, developing
materials that are cheaper or
greener, developing new packaging
bespoke to a particular product
or purpose such as maintaining
a specic temperature or a lower
weight to what is currently available.
Finally, is there a ready-made
solution or alternative to what you are
doing on the market? If not, this is an
indicator of R&D qualifying activity.
Many costs are claimable
including employee costs of those
MAXIMISING
THE BENEFITS
The UKs engineering and manufacturing sectors are world famous for their
expertise and ingenuity, yet infamous for being behind other sectors when it comes
to claiming R&D tax credits. Here, Eureka! puts forward why
you should claim.
Identifying what
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initially think.
carrying out R&D activities, including
salaries, employers NIC and pension
contributions; directors costs if they
are involved in the project; support
staff if they are engaged wholly or
partly in supporting the R&D; agency
staff; materials used in carrying
out the R&D, such as those for
prototyping or testing; materials that
are consumed or transformed as part
of the R&D; costs of electricity, gas,
water and other fuel directly relating
to the R&D can be claimed; software
to enable the R&D; and even some
subcontractor costs.
If you think you are eligible
to claim R&D tax credits or are
already claiming them, speak to
your accountant to ensure they are
experienced in preparing R&D
claims for your sector as, if they are
not, you are likely to miss out on
valuable parts of your claim.
ABOUT
THE
AUTHOR
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CALL JEZ WALTERS ON 01322 221144
TECHNOLOGY UPDATE
@:[email protected]
:+44 (0)1327 810383
www.infolytica.com/en/products/mfs/
@:[email protected]
:01430 861222
www.ws2.co.uk
Stainless Steels and Titanium are both prone to
galling and seizing. WS2 is a very low friction dry
lubricant surface treatment, developed by NASA for
use in deep space. It has been shown to provide a
very cost effective solution, preventing both
problems on threads and other sliding surfaces.
10-14 Torr. WS2 has been applied to bearings and
gears to extend life.
Design Out maintenance problems with WS2!
COFFEE TIME CHALLENGE
ÜÙØ×ÜØÛÎÍËâÖÒÌÛØ´ÎÙÜÒÕØ×
WWW.EUREKAMAGAZINE.CO.UK
he humble bicycle
helmet continues to
save countless lives
and for most that
commute on a bicycle, helmets
are a core part of their apparel.
However, for so many young
people, wearing a helmet still
has a stigma attached to it.
Wearing one is seen as uncool,
particularly for image conscious
teens trying to impress just about
everyone but their parents.
The trouble is, for the
most part helmets are an
uncomfortable necessity that is
there is case you need it, though
you hope you never will. There
is also an argument that helmets
dont adequately protect the
head for more serious incidents,
such as in the event of a collision
with a car.
The other lacking capability
of many bike helmets is that it
does not support the neck. As
many accidents will result in
the cyclist falling from the bike,
protecting the neck is vital. The
reality, however, is that most
choose not to bother protecting
the neck, as it makes a helmet
even more uncomfortable and
obtrusive to wear.
THE CHALLENGE
The challenge this month is to
therefore come up with a better
way of protecting the head
and neck of cyclists that isnt
a traditional helmet. The aim
is to make any such device so
discreet, even the most image
conscious teenager would
be able to wear one without
sulking.
The key for this challenge is
to implement new ideas that are
available in other industries, but
not to cyclists: think car safety!
The device could be installed
on the bike itself or worn by the
cyclist, though if it is to be worn,
it should be unnoticeable until
needed. Perhaps some kind of
rapid unfurling padded device
is the way to go. The question is,
how?
THE INVISIBLE
HELMET
The idea we have in mind
will be revealed in the
February issue
of
Eureka! Until then see what
you can come up with.
Submit ideas by leaving
a comment on the
Coffee
Time Challenge
section of
the
Eureka!
website.

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